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The Three Best Cuisines in the World

by oo’mämē Kitchen |

"The three best cuisines in the world are Chinese, Chinese and Chinese,"  or so claims the late, great James Beard.

Chengdu, the capital of the Szechuan Province and a UNESCO City of Gastronomy, is world-renowned for its spicy cuisine and culinary innovation (plus those cute giant pandas). And, while at first glance, Szechuan, one of China's eight regional cuisines, might seem to rely exclusively on hot and spicy notes, Chengdu’s 200+ Masters Chefs are skilled at nuance, coaxing out layered flavors with a finely tuned balance of the fiery Szechuan peppercorn.

Kung Pao chicken in a white bowl with chopsticks and a bowl of peanuts

While mapo tofu, dandan noodles and hot pot are staples of the traditional cuisine, perhaps the best known of Chengdu's dishes is Kung Pao chicken. Hot oil is infused with a variety of chilis, including mala, the famous Szechuan peppercorn. A contraction of two Chinese characters – Ma 麻   and La 辣 meaning numbing and spicy, Mala is aptly named. From there, Kung Pao gets a serious dose of peanuts, garlic, ginger and a few other aromatics, along with chicken marinated in a fermented rice wine, adding a level of savory umami. Delicious, but oh-so time consuming.

oo’mämē to the rescue!

jar of oomame chile crisp with spoon on white saucer
oo’mämē short-cuts that lengthy meal prep by providing a condiment you can add to your own selection of fresh ingredients with just ONE SPOONFUL. oo’mämē Chinese Chile Crisp brings layers of spicy Szechuan flavors and a variety of textures, creating that party in your mouth feel. Tingly Mala peppercorns, crispy red pepper flakes, chewy crystallized ginger, savory fermented black beans, and crunchy peanuts are just some of the guests at this party. Together they create a bold and sassy flavor-riot that packs a punch, taking you on a global culinary journey.

Fermented black beans are an oft-found player in Szechuan dishes. Also known as douchi, 豆豉 in Chinese, they are made from salting and fermenting black soybeans (or sometimes a lighter-colored soybean that darkens as it ferments) and have roots dating back 2200 years. Essential to mapo tofu, fermented black beans bring the salt, funk and umami, the Fifth Taste, to many dishes and are usually paired with other assertive flavors, like garlic, mala peppercorns and ginger. They bring the POW to an oo’mämē Kung Pao, creating bursts of flavor and an adventure in every bite.

Here are just a few ways you can zhuzh up leftovers and let oo’mämē do some heavy lifting in the kitchen. #CondimentRevolution

Fried Rice + oo’mämē

oo’mämē brings its fresh, feel-good flavor to every table and fried rice is a perfect place to give it a whirl. It’s saucy. It’s crispy. It’s crunchy. It’s chewy. It’s all kinds of heaven in one jar. oo’mämē is a first responder when it comes to culinary emergencies. Whether you start with ho-hum take-out fried rice, or cobble together your own, oo’mämē will bridge the gap between sad and sublime.

 

Chinese Leftover CPR

Last night it seemed like a GREAT idea to save all those dabs of take out leftovers. Now they look tired, dehydrated and a tiny bit disappointing. oo’mämē Chile Crisp for the win! Let’s turn that frown upside down.

Chinese Shrimp Salad

This yummy Chinese shrimp salad may look Instagram-worthy but don’t be fooled by its seeming complexity. Taste, yes!! It’s plenty complex. But meal prep?? Absolutely not. Pull together your favorite salad fixin's and make a drool-worthy dressing with just peanut butter, soy sauce, lime juice and oo’mämē. Collectively, that is a marriage made in heaven.

Follow along...

...as we journey to places, cultures and cuisines, we celebrate with our oo’mämē Global Chile Crisp Collection

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